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Source-specific workplace social support and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels among Japanese workers: A 1-year prospective cohort study

American Journal of Industrial Medicine - Tue, 05/17/2016 - 10:35
Background

This study investigated the prospective association between source-specific workplace social support and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in workers in Japan.

Methods

We conducted a 1-year prospective cohort study with 1,487 men and 533 women aged 18–65 years. Participants worked at two manufacturing worksites in Japan and were free of major illness. We used multivariable linear regression analyses to evaluate the prospective association between supervisor and coworker support at baseline, and hs-CRP levels at follow-up. We conducted the analyses separately for men and women.

Results

For women, high supervisor support at baseline was significantly associated with lower hs-CRP levels at follow-up (β = −0.109, P < 0.01), whereas coworker support at baseline was not significantly associated with hs-CRP levels at follow-up. Associations between supervisor and coworker support and hs-CRP levels were not significant for men.

Conclusions

Supervisor support may have beneficial effects on inflammatory markers in working women. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:676–684, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Categories: Trade Journals

Long-term self-reported exposure to occupational noise is associated with BMI-defined obesity in the US general population

American Journal of Industrial Medicine - Tue, 05/17/2016 - 10:30
Background

Evidence is emerging about the risk of obesity associated with traffic noise. The present study aimed to explore the association between self-reported occupational noise exposure and body mass index (BMI)-defined obesity in the US general population.

Methods

This study is based on the 2014 National Health Interview Survey. Information regarding self-reported occupational lifetime noise exposure was linked to self-reported BMI, adjusting for other covariates.

Results

The multivariate models yielded OR = 1.46 (95% CI: 1.27, 1.68) for obesity, and 0.97 kg/m2 (95% CI: 0.57, 1.36) higher BMI among participants exposed to high level of noise for ≥15 years, in comparison to never exposed participants. Moderation analysis revealed that among those less than 55 years of age noise had significantly stronger adverse effect. Those without cancer and diabetes also experienced stronger adverse effect.

Conclusions

Self-reported exposure to occupational noise was associated with increased odds of obesity and continuously measured BMI. Am. J. Ind. Med. 9999:XX–XX, © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Categories: Trade Journals

Analysis of workers’ compensation claims data for machine-related injuries in metal fabrication businesses

American Journal of Industrial Medicine - Mon, 05/16/2016 - 10:50
Background

Metal fabrication workers are at high risk for machine-related injury. Apart from amputations, data on factors contributing to this problem are generally absent.

Methods

Narrative text analysis was performed on workers' compensation claims in order to identify machine-related injuries and determine work tasks involved. Data were further evaluated on the basis of cost per claim, nature of injury, and part of body.

Results

From an initial set of 4,268 claims, 1,053 were classified as machine-related. Frequently identified tasks included machine operation (31%), workpiece handling (20%), setup/adjustment (15%), and removing chips (12%). Lacerations to finger(s), hand, or thumb comprised 38% of machine-related injuries; foreign body in the eye accounted for 20%. Amputations were relatively rare but had highest costs per claim (mean $21,059; median $11,998).

Conclusions

Despite limitations, workers' compensation data were useful in characterizing machine-related injuries. Improving the quality of data collected by insurers would enhance occupational injury surveillance and prevention efforts. Am. J. Ind. Med. 59:656–664, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Categories: Trade Journals

Good job, bad job: Occupational perceptions among Latino poultry workers

American Journal of Industrial Medicine - Mon, 05/16/2016 - 10:50
Abstract Objectives

Immigrant workers frequently take jobs that are physically demanding, provide low wages, and result in injuries (e.g., poultry production and processing). Through a qualitative approach, this paper elicits poultry workers’ evaluations of their jobs and set them in the larger context of their lives.

Methods

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 65 poultry workers in western North Carolina. Workers were asked to discuss job characteristics, physical and psychological impacts of their employment, and perceived health risks.

Results

Immigrant workers valued the stability, benefits, upward mobility, and pay offered. They disliked the physical demands, the potential perceived effects of the job on their health, and the interactions with bosses and peers.

Conclusions

Workers’ willingness to endure dirty, dangerous, and demanding (3-D) conditions of poultry must be understood in the context of other employment options, structural violence, and their focus on immediate family needs that positive aspects of these jobs can fulfill. Am. J. Ind. Med. 9999:1–10, © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Categories: Trade Journals

GreenWood, Inc. Contributes to Solvays Elite Plant Safety Recognition

OSHA (www.osha.gov) - Tue, 02/17/2009 - 06:00
GreenWood, an integrated maintenance and construction solutions provider, announces their customer, Solvay Advanced Polymers, has maintained their status as a VPP Star certified plant. The select group of those who have earned this safety distinction only include companies that religiously comply with the various OSHA safety regulations and procedures, and have achieved injury and illness rates at or below the national average of their respective industries. GreenWood provides Solvay with on-going supplemental maintenance, operations support and special project resources and works with Solvay team members daily to ensure the highest safety standards are maintained in all executed work.
Categories: OSHA Updates

U.S. Flu Activity Report - Week Ending February 7, 2009 (Week 5)

Centers for Disease Control: Flu - Fri, 02/13/2009 - 19:30
Latest information on influenza activity in the United States.
Categories: CDC News

U.S. Department of Labor's OSHA and Boat People SOS sign safety and health alliance agreement in Gretna, La.

OSHA (www.osha.gov) - Fri, 02/13/2009 - 06:00
Enhancing workplace safety and health for Vietnamese-American workers in Louisiana is the goal of a new alliance formed between the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Gretna, La., branch office of Boat People SOS. The signing ceremony was held today at OSHA's area office in Baton Rouge.This agreement provides an opportunity for partners involved to join together in promoting safety and health in the workplace, said Dorinda Folse, OSHA's area director in Baton Rouge. We are hopeful that the cooperative effort to maximize worker safety will prevent potential injuries.
Categories: OSHA Updates

The Flu I.Q. interactive quiz widget

Centers for Disease Control: Flu - Tue, 02/10/2009 - 15:00
The Flu I.Q. widget is an interactive quiz to test your flu knowledge. Place the Flu I.Q. Widget on your Web site, portal home page or on your blog to help others raise their flu I.Q. too! Don’t worry if you don’t know all the answers at first, the Flu I.Q. widget is an easy and fun way to learn what's true about flu.
Categories: CDC News

Monsanto Aviation of Chesterfield, Mo., earns OSHA's highest recognition for outstanding achievement in workplace safety and health

OSHA (www.osha.gov) - Tue, 02/10/2009 - 06:00
The U.S. Department of Labors Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has designated Monsanto Aviation Inc., Chesterfield, Mo., as a Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP) star site, the agencys highest recognition for meeting or exceeding workplace safety and health standards.Monsanto Aviation, which has 25 employees who operate and maintain four company aircraft, earned VPP star recognition following a comprehensive onsite evaluation by a team of OSHA safety and health experts.
Categories: OSHA Updates
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